Our Wood's History

These are just a few of the buildings we have material from in stock. Peruse the following stories to get an idea of the historical significance our inventory has.

Wreck of the Old 97

Danville, VA The Wreck of the Old 97 occurred on September 27, 1903, when the Southern Railway freight train called the Fast Mail (or "Old 97") left the tracks and crashed at the Stillhouse Trestle outside Danville, Virginia, killing eleven people. The accident became a sensation, with thousands of spectators at the scene, newspaper stories, and even a series of musical ballads, the most popular of which became a hit on the country music charts in 1924. Read More...

The Pennsylvania Barn

Circa Late 18th Century through Early 20th Centiry (Bldg Certification #2.003) Scattered throughout the U.S. landscape, weatherworn barns with timbers silvered by age stand as testaments to our nation's past. America was founded on the strength, stability and freedom of the family farm, asserts Michael J. Auer of the National Park Service. "As the main structure of farms, barns evoke a sense of tradition and security, of closeness to the land and community with the people who built them." Read More...

The Edison

(officially, the Wisconsin Chair Company)
Circa early to mid 1900s (Building Certification #2.002)
Thomas Alva Edison – whose bent for invention made him the age of electricity's sparkplug – would have been unable to fully appreciate his groundbreaking invention, the phonograph. At an early age, Edison's hearing was impaired. All the same, in 1877 he created a machine that could reproduce sound, and its impact reverberated around the world, including in the town of New London, Wisconsin. Read More...

Rip Van Winkle Distillery's Lawrenceburg Warehouse

Circa 1935 (Building Certification #1.002)
At one time during the last century, this Kentucky distillery—which dates back to the 1880s—hummed, its operations carried out in a complex of buildings and warehouses. Times changed though, and the industry with it, and the buildings came down one by one, save the last remaining bottling house. Among the last buildings to go was a warehouse that, instead of being demolished, was deconstructed, and the wood was reclaimed in 2008. Read More...

R.J Reynolds' Tobacco Sheds 123 and 157

Circa 1923 and 1928  (Building Certification #1.005)
Without a doubt, R.J. Reynolds and Winston-Salem have enjoyed a symbiotic relationship for more than a century, and it all began with an industrious man whose entrepreneurial spirit led to the creation of a thriving tobacco empire. Indeed, it is no surprise that Winston-Salem is known as “Camel City,” a reference to the company’s preeminent cigarette brand. Read More...

Long Mill, Dan River Inc

Circa 1887 to 1921 (Building Certification #2.006)
There was a time when the shirts worn by millions of men and women each day and the sheets on which they slept at night came from fabric made in mills that stood beside the Dan River, nestled deep in the heart of Virginia's farmlands. The company's mills and support buildings stretched for three miles along the banks of the river in the town of Danville, and at one time, it was the largest single-unit textile plant in the world. Read More...

Larson Tobacco Warehouse

Circa 1920  (Building Certification #1.006)
When most people think of tobacco, undoubtedly Wisconsin is not the first state that comes to mind. But to nineteenth century Wisconsin settlers, it was a common staple and a valuable cash crop. Read More...

Jim Beam Warehouse N

Circa 1954  (Building Certification #2.004) 
In 1974, a tornado tore through Beam, Kentucky, ripping the roof off a seven-story warehouse and twisting it on its very foundation. That post-and-beam building, called simply Warehouse N, stored roughly one million gallons of Jim Beam bourbon. It housed approximately 20,000 barrels at a time, where the famous whiskey aged for at least four years—though after the tornado, it's suspected that the Warehouse N barrels benefited from a little extra aging.
Read More...

Houses of the Appalachian Mountains

The mountains are the soul of the region. To understand the mountains is to know ourselves. -Sandra H.B. Clark for USGS Once housing the farming families in the Appalachian mountains, these homes were built with a high level of craftsmanship with the best available woods in the region.  With no electrical, plumbing, or insulation, the homesites yield spectacular architectural salvage.
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Greeneville Redrying Co. Warehouse

Circa 1930 (Building Certification #1.003)
Deconsructing old buildings often takes us to towns that produced revered American icons.  Greeneville, Tennessee is the home of Davy Crockett. A man of many common sense sayings, we especially love two bits of his still sound advice: "Let your tongue speak what your heart thinks", and "I have always supported measures and principles and not men."  Like our wood, history and its influential figures are worthy of preservation.  Read More...

Golden Burley Tobacco Warehouse

Circa 1930s  (Building Certification #2.001)
Ask and just about any Carrolltonian will tell you that this Kentucky town of less than 4,000 was once the third largest burley tobacco market in the nation.  Read More...

Federal Compass

Circa 1920s to late 1930s  (Building Certification #2.005)
The sound of the Federal Compress still echoes in the memories of some of the folks who grew up in the East Liberty Avenue area of Covington, Tennessee. During much of the twentieth century, the whistle and hiss issuing from the facility as the compress compacted 500-pound bales of cotton signaled the arrival of fall, and with it, harvest season. Cotton became king in the American South after 1793 when Eli Whitney secured a patent on the cotton gin.   Read More...

Corriher Mill

Circa 1913  (Building Certification #1.001)
In the early twentieth century, the cotton industry brought the city of Landis, North Carolina, to life. Aware of the success of cotton in nearby towns, prominent landowners—many from the Linn family—organized and chartered the Linn Mill in 1900. The following year, the city of Landis was officially incorporated. Read More...

Bessemer City Cotton Mills

Circa 1897  (Building Certification #1.004)
Some would call the beginnings of the Bessemer City Cotton Mills inauspicious, starting with its founder. The mills were just one business venture in a series of cotton mills established and eventually sold by John Askew Smith, one of the founders of Bessemer City, located in Gaston County, North Carolina.  Read More...